Sculpture


2008 Greg Kucera Gallery Installation View

BLANKET STORIES: Cradle (blue), 2011
Cast resin
16 x 16 x 16 inches
Variable edition of 6, each unique

BLANKET STORIES: Cradle (blue), 2011

BLANKET STORIES: CRADLE, 2011
Cast iron
16 x 16 x 16 inches

Variable edition of 6, each unique

DETAILS: BLANKET STORIES: CRADLE, 2011




PART AND WHOLE:
REMNANT, REQUIEM, HAND, 2011
Wool blankets (reclaimed) and thread
25 x 32 inches
$4,000



SKYWALKER/SKYSCRAPER
(STADIUM), 2012
Wool blankets (reclaimed),
thread and embroidery floss
17 x 33 inches
SOLD


CANOPY: LEDGER, 2007
Wood, wool blankets, satin binding
53 x 15 x 15 inches
$28,000.



EASY CHAIR, 2012
Wool blankets (reclaimed) and thread
10.5 x 9.5 inches
$2,600



CRADLE: COBBLE (CARROLL GARDENS), 2012
Cast bronze and maple
5.75 x 6 x 5 inches
$3,000


CRADLE: COBBLE (SOUTH SLOPE), 2012
Cast bronze and brick
4 x 3.25 x 2.75 inches
$2,000


CRADLE: COBBLE (GOWANUS), 2012
Cast bronze and concrete
3.75 x 4 x 4 inches
$2,500



WORRY STONE (pink pouch), 2007
Bronze and reclaimed wool blankets
Dimensions vary
Variable edition of 30
$900



SHELL, 2005
Bronze and wool with cedar base
2.5 x 5.75 x 5.75 inches
Edition of 10
$1,600

"Freud considered blankets as ‘transitional’ objects, but I like to consider how these humble pieces of cloth are transformational. Blankets are a part of how we are received into the world and also how we depart this world. Blankets are used for warmth and shelter. Children use them for hiding and to construct impromptu forts. A blanket is a catcher of dreams and ledger of secrets. Wool blankets are the pelts of our animal relatives, the sheep. Blankets are body-like.

Blankets are also very personal to me. I am Seneca, one of the six tribes that make up the Iroquois Nation, and in my tribe and native communities, we give away blankets to honor people for being witness to important life events. In this way, it is as much of an honor to give away a blanket as it is to receive one. Ultimately, wool blankets are simple objects with stories that connect us.
" —Marie Watt


TETHER, 2008 with reverse side
Wool blankets (reclaimed), satin,
thread, embroidery floss, and lead weight
21 x 23 inches double sided
$4,000


Tether
“Tether is a two sided piece. My interest in making something two-sided has been gestating for a while. I have long been interested in the residue or history of mark making that a viewer typically can't see when a work is formally presented. About two years ago I saw James Castle's drawings for the first time. The work moved me in many ways, as did his use of the paper on which he frequently drew on both sides. I suspect that on Castle's part, working both sides of the page was a compulsion. Perhaps it felt like the correct thing to do or maybe it was a decision to use his material resources most economically. One of my experiences in viewing James Castle's drawings is that his content and its manifestation reflects something about dualities—things hidden and revealed, the public and private, and a visual expression of something that may be kept secret. In a small way Tether pays homage to James Castle and some elemental forms that connect me to this place.” —Marie Watt